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Understanding the Digital Candidate

over 1 year ago by Robert Wilde

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Recently one of my team came into the office with a video of his daughter in the Apple shop using and choosing a smart phone and within seconds she was able to find a programme, open it and use it (she was 2 years old!!). We were amazed in the office, but really the design of the Apple phone is such that it is instictive and childs play (almost literally). More importantly, you don't even need to be able to read to use it.

We spend every working day discussing the candidates' relationship with recruitment agencies. We also spend time explaining the difference between a digital experience and face to face or 'off-line' experience.

As human beings we are often programmed to behave in certains ways and react to certain activity, and this is no different in the digital economy. Users of both Ebay, Google and Amazon amongst other sites can almost blindly navigate, choose and buy without ever resorting to picking up a 'how to guide'.

We design our sites to be simple to use, we design with our users in mind, and ensure that this effective design does not compromise the Brand requirements of our customers. We also use intelligent learning to modify, improve and measure results. 

It's easy to confuse user design with lack of creativity, but why change something if it works? This is a topic covered in more depth here in our post about being innovative. Innovation can also mean building something better from a tried-and-tested model - standing on the shoulders of giants, so to speak.

Simple doesn't mean boring!